BA SH AS H A, A L E X T.
(Ph.D Student)
Department of Political Studies
Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University
South Africa.


Abstract

This Study delves into Uganda’s constitutional crisis and how it undermined constitutionalism between 1962 and 1986. It observes that whereas Uganda was envisaged to metamorphosize into a full-fledged democracy to enjoy the full benefits of constitutionalism after attaining its independence in 1962, the country shortly degenerated into a constitutional crisis which saw it governed under three constitutions in a mere period of five years (1962 to 1967). This constitutional crisis inevitably and greatly undermined constitutionalism in Uganda in that, during its after mass, the country was not only governed by decrees from 1971 to 1979 and by the Military Commission in 1980, but was also subjected to arbitrary rule from 1981 to the beginning of 1986. Moreover, during the entire period, successive governments greatly compromised the principles of good governance, undermined and eroded the independence of the judiciary, did not hold any free and fair elections, and failed or deliberately refused to: restrain themselves from arbitrary exercise of power – which culminated into massive human rights abuses; ensure easy or peaceful and/or orderly change of power; practice politics as provided for under the constitutions; and overall, operate within the limits of the constitution(s). 

 

African Journal of International Politics and Diplomacy Vol.6 No. 1&2 © 2017
by The Development Universal Consortia. All Rights Reserved